Archive | January 12, 2013

Blue land crab

Males of the blue land crab (Cardisoma guanhumi) from the Dominican Republic sport giant claws used in territorial display and combat. [Nikon D1x, Nikkor 17-35mm]

Males of the blue land crab (Cardisoma guanhumi) from the Dominican Republic sport giant claws used in territorial display and combat. [Nikon D1x, Nikkor 17-35mm]

Unable to break her ties to the sea, a female blue land crab cautiously approaches the edge of the beach to release her eggs during the full moon. Shecannot swim, thus she must be careful not to be swept away by the waves, and soon she runs back to her burrow in the forest. Her planktonic larvae will develop into tiny crabs in less than two months and then will leave the ocean to begin terrestrial life. [Nikon D1x, Nikkor 17-35mm, flash Nikon SB-28DX]

Unable to break her ties to the sea, a female blue land crab cautiously approaches the edge of the beach to release her eggs during the full moon. She
cannot swim, thus she must be careful not to be swept away by the waves, and soon she runs back to her burrow in the forest. Her planktonic larvae will develop into tiny crabs in less than two months and then will leave the ocean to begin terrestrial life. [Nikon D1x, Nikkor 17-35mm, flash Nikon SB-28DX]

[An excerpt from the book “The Smaller Majority.”]