About

Piotr (Peter) Naskrecki is an entomologist, photographer and author, based at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University (Cambridge, MA, USA.). He received his M. Sc. degree in Zoology from the A. Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland;, and a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Between 2002 and 2009 Piotr served as Director of the Invertebrate Diversity Initiative at the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science at Conservation International, Washington, D.C. His research focuses on the evolution of katydids and related insects, and the theory and practice of nature conservation.

As a photographer, Piotr strives to promote appreciation and conservation of invertebrate animals – insects, arachnids, and their kin – by capturing both their beauty and roles as vital, often critically important members of the Earth’s ecosystems. He is one of the founding members of the International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP).

Piotr is the author of over 30 scientific, peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, and his photographs and nature writing have been published in a number of national and international publications, including The Smithsonian Magazine, Natural History, National Wildlife, National Geographic, BBC Wildlife Magazine, BBC Knowledge, Terre Sauvage, Time magazine, Ranger Rick, and many others. His book “The Smaller Majority” (Harvard University Press 2005) illustrates a multitude of threats faced by invertebrate animals, whereas his most recent book “Relics: Travels in Nature’s Time Machine” (University of Chicago Press 2011) explores ancient organisms and ecosystems of the globe. Piotr’s photography has been exhibited in numerous venues, including the American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Natural Museum in London, Harvard Museum of Natural History, Aquamarine Fukushima (Japan), and others.

To license Piotr Naskrecki’s images please contact Minden Pictures stock agency. If the images you are looking for are not available in the Minden’s catalog please contact us directly. You can also visit Piotr’s website at www.naskrecki.com to see additional images.

Piotr’s expertise is available for press or book assignments as either a photographer or a science writer. Contact us for details.

14 Comments

14 thoughts on “About

  1. Hi Piotr
    Len de Beer in Maputo Mozambique here. I saw your pics from Gorongoza and there is a particular Mantid that you photographed that I took a picture of in Nelspruit (South africa). I would like to send you the photo. Please contact me at len.debeer@gmail.com
    Thank you
    Len

  2. Ma Pan fantastyczne fotografie. Gratuluje zdjec w NYT – sa swietne. Dziekuje za info nt sprzetu, ktore Pan podaje przy kazdym zdjeciu. Powodzenia. Tomasz Kruk

  3. The world definitely does need another photo blog when the photos AND the writing are this good.
    My 7 year old daughter and I are captivated by every new post. Thank you for taking the time to do this.

    Regards

    Duncan
    Leeds
    England

  4. Pingback: Conservation Photography in the Digital Age | The Prairie Ecologist

  5. Hi Dr. Naskrecki,
    I want to your help about MANTIS that developed by you. I want to change mantis photo at the menu interface of MANTIS. But I do not know how can i do it. And the other problem is, in the first run of MANTIS it gives an error about betwween the sytem date and time and the file settings. How can I fixed it.

    Sincerely yours.

    Note:
    1. Sorry my English.
    2. Good blog and good work (MANTIS).

    • Witaj PIOTR !!
      PRZEZ WIELE LAT PODZIWIAM TWOJĄ PASJE ,
      JESTEŚ NIESAMOWITY !!!!!!
      PAMIETAM TWOJE GABLOTKI Z OWADAMI W DOMU
      I OPOWIESCI Z NIMI ZWIAZANE

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  9. Dear Piotr
    I had hoped that we’d meet one day in Mozambique – MO Rodel was going to try and fix things up. Hopefully sometime. Please contact me if you have chance about the blindsnakes and other groups in the region. Congratulations on the absolutely stunning photography and interesting text. Smaller Majority is one of my favourite sites.

  10. Pingback: Spring Snowmelt Creates Short-Lived Ecosystems and “Master Survivalists” | UW-Madison Center for Limnology

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