Improvising with light

One of the more valuable skills in nature photography is the ability to improvise, and make do with what you have at hand. I would love to be able to have all my equipment with me every time I take a walk in an interesting area, but this is never the case. The one predictable…

Out of Africa

A few days ago I came back from Mozambique, where I had spent 8 weeks conducting a comprehensive survey of orthopteroid insects (katydids, grasshoppers, and their allies) of the Gorongosa National Park. Needless to say, I also took a lot of photos; 14,520 to be exact. I thought that I went there well-prepared for any…

Travels in the Meddle Earth

“Go!” is the last word I hear, and then it’s only the swish of air, panic in my heart, and the river getting closer with every nanosecond. Right at the moment I am ready to have my skull crushed, something pulls me up, and I am flying towards the top of the canyon again. Ah,…

African Bats: Conservation in the Time of Ebola

A guest post by Jen Guyton The last fragile wing finally came free from the threads of my mist net. I sank into the sand on the riverbank, took a deep breath, and tugged off my yellow deerskin gloves. Eight cotton bags wiggled as they hung from the line that tethered my mist net to…

Involuntary Bioslaughter and Why a Spider is Dead

“Hey, where is the spider post?”, you may be asking if you arrived at this page by following one of the thousands of links that sprung up overnight in the online media and social circuits. In the fine tradition of online publishing I took the liberty of pulling a “bait-and-click” switcheroo, and turning the hysteria…

Mozambique Diary: The House of Spiders

A guest post by Edward O. Wilson At the end of a long rutted road in the park sits a conspicuous artifact in the midst of wilderness. Built in 1970, the Hippo House was the vantage point, the antigo miradouro, from which well-heeled tourists, cool drinks in hand, watched wildlife herds as they grazed over…